‘Cause the whole world, loves it when you’re going down… (AKA How could I forget?!?)

Greek, Levantine Arabic
So, in my post on lexical similarities between Levantine Arabic and Greek I talked about the uber-dramatic (but not uncommonly used) "you broke the world" (χάλασε τον κόσμο in Greek, خربت الدنيا in Levantine). What I forgot to mention was that the word دنيا (dinye in Levantine, dunya in Egyptian) is itself used in Greek.  Ντούνιας (dounias) means "world" in Greek as well, and is used in certain fixed expressions with a more poetic or metaphorical meaning.  For example, the phrase σ'αυτό το ντούνια (safto to dounia) literally just means in this world but, with the feeling and the weight of it added in, would translate to something more like "in this world of ours". And now, just because I teased you with the title...have some Outkast: [embed]https://youtu.be/udmTfK6_aM8[/embed]   PS: I…
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Be well!

General language learning, Greek, Levantine Arabic
Languages of Life had post recently entitled "The verb سلم/يسلم" all about, as you might guess if you read Arabic script, the verb silem and it's various uses. If you're studying Arabic make sure to check out the original post as it's very worthwhile, but I want to pull out a couple of points that will be of interest to people who are learning or who speak Greek or Arabic. تسلم/تسلمي (tislam/tislami), which translates to “be well” is one of the many expressions for “thank you” that you’ll hear in the Levant. I’ve heard this expression used more frequently than شكرا (shukran) when indicating thanks. There's a phrase used to mean both thank you, and as a response to thank you in Greek: να'σαι/να'στε καλά (nase/naste kala...from να + είσαι/είστε…
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Lexical similarities between Greek and Levantine Arabic

Lexical similarities between Greek and Levantine Arabic

General language learning, Greece, Greek, Levantine Arabic
One of the reasons I choose Levantine as the variety of Arabic I wanted to study, aside from my fascination with Lebanon as a francophone, and the widespread intelligibility of the language due to Lebanese media, was the interaction since ancient times between the Levant as it's traditionally understood today (Lebanon, Palestine, Jordan, Syria, Cyprus, Israel) and the wider historical Levant, essentially the eastern Mediterranean including Egypt and Greece. [caption id="attachment_168" align="aligncenter" width="225"] Yes, what I'm saying is essentially Mr. Robot is the human embodiment of the wider Levant.  Seriously, Google Rami Malek.[/caption] Now of course in almost no case of extended contact between two language groups does either language emerge completely uninfluenced by the other (hell, the entire Balkan Sprachbund is a testament to the power of areal influence…
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