Review: Levantine Arabic Verbs by Lingualism

Levantine Arabic, Reviews
I normally only review free resources on this site (since that's pretty much all I use) but I'm breaking with that pattern for this book. Levantine Arabic Verbs by Lingualism (see my review of their site here) is quite possibly the best resource I've seen for learning Levantine Arabic Verbs in a systematic, easily referenceable manner, free or paid.  The only site that rivals it in its treatment of individual verbs is the venerable Team Maha, but there's nothing the beat the variety and scope of this book.  This book is probably the closest thing I've seen to the classic (for a reason) Barron's 501 verbs books for Levantine Arabic. Levantine Arabic Verbs starts out with a treatment of the vowels and consonants of Levantine, and then gives 97 verbs…
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Lingualism

Levantine Arabic
I don't know how it escaped my attention, but a new website with a wealth of material, much of it accessible for free, has appeared. Lingualism's main focus seems to be Arabic (Egyptian and Levantine mostly), although they also have a Spanish and a Russian site.  They have a library of listening exercises for their various (paid) publications but they also have a selection of free readings (called diaries), with a story read aloud in Levantine or Egyptian accompanied by transcripts and translation.  These are actually really useful at the beginning levels to get used to the prosody of the language (and, since they have Lebanese and Syrian narrators, to hear the subtle differences between the two varieties), and at higher levels they're a great way to practice listening for…
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#teammaha = GOAT*

Levantine Arabic
Chris Hitchcock and the wizards over on the Team Nisreen side of the ever-incredible #teammaha have put out a PDF of their Fusha to Shami guide which, in my not terribly humble opinion, rivals MANY of the paid resources out there.  Do yourself a favor and download it هلأ.   *GOAT = greatest of all time, in modern (c. 2017) internet-speak.
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Spoken Arabic Simplified

General language learning, Levantine Arabic
A while back I stumbled upon this YouTube channel with short (1-3 min average) lessons on Levantine Arabic (Palestinian variety from what I can see).  Each video focuses on a part of speech like verbs or adverbs, and has concurrent word-for-word and idiomatic translation of the phrases spoken. This particular YouTuber seems to also speak several other languages and has a smattering of videos in those languages as well, but the bulk of their content seems to be focused on Levantine Arabic. Here's a sample, be sure to check out the channel for more: [embed]http://youtu.be/wnCBtK1pPNU[/embed]
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Online Levantine Dictionary

Levantine Arabic
The awesome folks over at #TeamMaha had this post, which clued me in to the existence of The Living Arabic Project and their fantastic Levantine, Egyptian, and MSA dictionaries.  Apparently the Levantine dictionary is still a work in progress but it looks like the author has made a great start. As anyone who has studied Arabic varieties knows, one of the greatest frustrations is finding a dictionary for the variety you're trying to learn, and this site promises to be an excellent resource for those working on Egyptian and Levantine.
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‘Cause the whole world, loves it when you’re going down… (AKA How could I forget?!?)

Greek, Levantine Arabic
So, in my post on lexical similarities between Levantine Arabic and Greek I talked about the uber-dramatic (but not uncommonly used) "you broke the world" (χάλασε τον κόσμο in Greek, خربت الدنيا in Levantine). What I forgot to mention was that the word دنيا (dinye in Levantine, dunya in Egyptian) is itself used in Greek.  Ντούνιας (dounias) means "world" in Greek as well, and is used in certain fixed expressions with a more poetic or metaphorical meaning.  For example, the phrase σ'αυτό το ντούνια (safto to dounia) literally just means in this world but, with the feeling and the weight of it added in, would translate to something more like "in this world of ours". And now, just because I teased you with the title...have some Outkast: [embed]https://youtu.be/udmTfK6_aM8[/embed]   PS: I…
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#TeamNisreen is a thing. A glorious, glorious thing.

Levantine Arabic
Most of you know of my love for the hilarious and snarky (and sometimes very astute) musings of #TeamMaha.  #TeamMaha focuses mostly on Egyptian Arabic, while this site focuses on Levantine, but I still enjoy the hell out of it. Well now #TeamMaha is featuring guests posts delving into Levantine Arabic by #TeamNisreen and, guess what?  They're just as funny and informative. #Winning.
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The motherlode

Levantine Arabic
An awesome user at the /r/learn_arabic sub-reddit on Reddit has put in some major work and is making what is already one of the best resources for Lebanese Arabic I have ever seen (and he's just getting started!).  It's called Yalla! Learn Lebanese, and it is spectacular. So far he has numbers, colors, verb forms, greetings, a map of Lebanon, food and kitchen related words, and an answer key for Shou Fi Ma Fi.  He's even got the new مشروع ليلى song "3 Minutes" (which, if you haven't heard it, what the hell are you doing with your life?).  Best part?  NO A BARE MINIMUM OF FREAKING TRANSLITERATION!!!  Transliteration is the bane of my damn existence, especially when it comes to dealing with vernacular Arabic, and fortunately his site has very…
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Jordanian Arabic Grammar Guide

Levantine Arabic
The Peace Corps has a great Jordanian (i.e. Levantine) Arabic grammar guide that does an excellent job covering the basics including past, present, and future verb conjugation and the basics of adjective declension.  It's actually an invaluable quick reference. Jordanian Arabic Grammar: A short guide for beginners
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Language Transfer

Greek, Levantine Arabic
Language Transfer is an organization that has put out a few high-quality language courses so far, with an aim to produce more in the future. Some of their first courses were Greek, Spanish, and Egyptian Arabic. This summer they're going back to Greece, recording a new Greek course, and scrapping the old one when the new one is done. Their courses are all free, and they all seem quite good (I've only skimmed them because they're all in languages I already speak, or am not currently learning).  The format is basically an in-classroom recording, where the teacher explains the mechanics of the language in English (they talk about this in their page on "the thinking method", which I find really resonates with my ideas and experiences about language learning and…
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